Mirepoix

Green Onion Mirepoix
Mirepoix (pronounced “meer-pwah”) is one of the most common food preparations in the world. It’s simply a combination of one part celery, one part carrot and two parts onion. In the photo above we have chosen to use green onions for their herbaceous and subtle flavor.


Basic Mirepoix Recipe

1 cup diced onion
1/2 cup diced carrot
1/2 cup diced celery

When dicing the separate ingredients, try to make the dices as uniform as possible, both because it is aesthetically more pleasing to the eye and because the pieces will cook more uniformly.

Why mirepoix? Well, these three basic ingredients, in this traditional ratio, provide a deep, earthy flavor. Mirepoix is an aromatic combination that is as basic to cooking as salt and pepper. Carrots add sweetness while celery adds a unique grassy flavor profile. You can switch the portions for other effects such as sweetness or tartness, depending on how it is to be used. Various flavor profiles can be developed just by using the different types of onions, shallots and scallions. Mirepoix is also used in large chunks, as in a pot roast, and can be pureed to use as a topping.

Try stewing a chicken in a slow cooker with just mirepoix and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. I often use pureed mirepoix to deglaze a pan after cooking pork chops. It takes on the flavor that is derived from deep grill marks for that deep smokey note. Stir vigorously to get the frond off the bottom of the pan, then pour the mixture over the top of the chops. You can also use your emersion blender to reduce the mirepoix to a puree to use as a topping for any variety of sides with complimentary flavors.

Also see Holy Trinity, the Cajun and Creole version used for those cooking styles.

 

Photo credit: wikipedia.org

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